AnthWest, occurrence records for wool carder bees of the genus Anthidium (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae, Anthidiini) in the Western Hemisphere

AnthWest is a large dataset, one of the outcomes of a comprehensive, broadly comparative study on the diversity, biology, biogeography, and evolution of Anthidium Fabricius in the Western Hemisphere. In this dataset a total of 22,648 adult occurrence records comprising 9,657 unique events are documented for 92 species of Anthidium, including the invasive range of two introduced species from Eurasia, A. oblongatum (Illiger) and A. manicatum (Linnaeus). The geospatial coverage of the dataset extends from northern Canada and Alaska to southern Argentina, and from below sea level in Death Valley, California, USA, to 4,700 m a.s.l. in Tucumán, Argentina. The majority of the records in the dataset correspond to information recorded from individual specimens examined by the authors during this project, and deposited into 60 biodiversity collections located in Africa, Europe, North and South America.

Animals and Livestock

Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN)

The Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN) web server provides germplasm information about plants, animals, microbes and invertebrates important for food and agricultural production. These include lists of currently registered cultivars, historical seed and varietal catalogs, and related resources. There are more than 500,000 accessions (distinct varieties of plants) in the GRIN database. These accessions represent more than 10,000 species of plants. See the Helps and Hints page if you are having trouble getting your results.

Ag Data Commons

LTAR Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed Lucky Hills Phenocam

A stationary camera overlooking the Lucky Hills sub-watershed in the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed used to track vegetation phenology (RGB and IR imagery). Images are taken every 30 minutes between 4:00am and 10:30pm local standard time.

A link to the Phenocam's network FAQ:

Long-term Agro-ecosystem Research Initiative