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Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Croplands

    This download provides three datasets aggregated from the original output of the 172 crops; total emissions from croplands, per kilocalorie emissions from croplands and per food kilocalorie emissions from cropland.

    USDA-ARS Colorado Maize Water Productivity Dataset 2012-2013

      The USDA-Agricultural Research Service carried out an experiment on water productivity in response to seasonal timing of irrigation of maize (*Zea mays* L.) at the Limited Irrigation Research Farm (LIRF) facility in northeastern Colorado (40°26’ N, 104°38’ W) starting in 2012. Twelve treatments involved different water availability targeted at specific growth-stages. This dataset includes data from the first two years, which were complete years with intact treatments. Data includes canopy growth and development (canopy height, canopy cover and LAI), irrigation, precipitation, and soil water storage measured periodically through the season; daily estimates of crop evapotranspiration; and seasonal measurement of crop water use, harvest index and crop yield. Hourly and daily weather data are also provided from the CoAgMET, Colorado’s network of meteorological information.

      Useful to Usable: Developing usable climate science for agriculture

        Useful to Usable (U2U): Transforming Climate Variability and Change Information for Cereal Crop Producers, was a USDA-funded research and extension project designed to improve the resilience and profitability of U.S. farms in the Corn Belt amid a changing climate. Over a six-year period from April 2011 - April 2017, 122 faculty, staff, graduate students, and undergraduate students from ten Midwestern universities contributed to this interdisciplinary project. Our team integrated expertise in applied climatology, crop modeling, agronomy, cyber-technology, agricultural economics, sociology, Extension and outreach, communication, and marketing to improve the use and uptake of climate information for agricultural decision making. Together, and with members of the agricultural community, we developed a series of decision support tools, resource materials, and training methods to support data-driven decision making and the adoption of climate-resilient practices.

        Agricultural Land Management Alternative with Numerical Assessment Criteria (ALMANAC) Simulation Model

          The Agricultural Land Management Alternative with Numerical Assessment Criteria (ALMANAC) model simulates crop growth, competition, light interception by leaves, biomass accumulation, partitioning of biomass into grain, water use, nutrient uptake, and growth constraints such as water, temperature, and nutrient stress. Plant development is temperature driven, with duration of growth stages dependent on degree days. Each plant species has a defined base temperature and optimum temperature.

          Soil and Water Hub Modeling Datasets

            The Soil and Water Hub is jointly developed by USDA Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) and Texas A&M AgriLife Research, part of The Texas A&M University System. Modeling dataset resources are available for download for use with software tools Agricultural Policy/Environmental eXtender Model (APEX), Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), ArcSWAT, and related Conservation practices.

            SWAT - Soil and Water Assessment Tool

              The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a public domain model jointly developed by USDA Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) and Texas A&M AgriLife Research, part of The Texas A&M University System. SWAT is a small watershed to river basin-scale model to simulate the quality and quantity of surface and ground water and predict the environmental impact of land use, land management practices, and climate change. SWAT is widely used in assessing soil erosion prevention and control, non-point source pollution control and regional management in watersheds.