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Website Pointer to NANP Feed Composition Database

This database was developed by the Feed Composition Sub-Committee and serves as a freely-available, centralized resource for up-to-date nutrient composition data for feedstuffs commonly fed to animal species. There are currently 123 ingredients and 129 nutrients represented in the database.

Users can search for an ingredient name or browse the following ingredient categories:

  • Animal proteins: Feeds and by-products derived from livestock, poultry, dairy, and (or) aquaculture industries. Feeds in this category are a good source of protein (average crude protein > 50%) and limiting amino acids, lysine, methionine, and tryptophan.

  • By-products and Others: By-products from the human food and ethanol industries used as animal feeds. Feeds in this category contain mostly by-products from cereal milling (corn, wheat, and rice), sugar manufacturing (cane, and beet), brewing process (grain and yeast residues), and exotic feeds (i.e., cassava and copra); as well as distiller’s grains from several cereals (corn, barley, sorghum and wheat). Nutrient composition for feeds within this category vary.

  • Forages, Grain Crops: Feeds containing the aerial part and (often) the grain of cereal plants. Feeds in this category include fresh forages, hay and silages for corn, rye, sorghum, sudan-grass, wheat, and triticale plants classified by maturity level (immature, mid-maturity and mature. Grain crop forages offer a good source of highly digestible carbohydrates (starch) and fiber (NDF and ADF) for ruminant nutrition.

  • Forages, Legumes and Grasses: Feeds containing the aerial part of legume plants, grasses and other less common forages. Feeds in this category include fresh forages, hay and silages for legumes, cool-season grasses, and legume-grass mixtures classified by maturity level (immature, mid-maturity and mature). Unlike other categories forages were classified by type and not by species, because conservation method and maturity level are more important than specific species to determine forage quality. Legumes forages (alfalfa and clover) are a good source of protein for ruminants.

  • Grain Products: Feed category comprising seeds from cereals such as barley, corn, oat, rice, rye, sorghum triticale and wheat. Seeds could be whole or ground. Cereals are a good source of highly digestible carbohydrates (starch) used in both non-ruminant and ruminant nutrition.

  • Oilseeds and Plant Proteins: Feed category comprising oilseeds (seeds with high fat content); by-products from the oil industry such as mechanical and solvent extracted oilseed meals and other seeds such as beans and peas. This feed category contain feeds with high protein-content. The crude protein content for beans, field peas and peas > 20%, oilseed > 40%, oilseed meals > 45%.