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Cassavabase

    The Next Generation Cassava Breeding (NEXTGEN Cassava) project aims to significantly increase the rate of genetic improvement in cassava breeding and unlock the full potential of cassava, a staple crop central to food security and livelihoods across Africa. The project will implement and empirically test a new breeding method known as Genomic Selection that relies on statistical modeling to predict cassava performance before field-testing, and dramatically accelerates the breeding cycle.

    Panzea

      Panzea is an NSF-funded project called "Biology of Rare Alleles in Maize and its Wild Relatives". We are investigating the connection between phenotype (what we see) and genotype (the genes underlying the phenotype) - of complex traits in maize and its wild relative, teosinte, and specifically in how rare genetic variations contribute to overall plant function. These studies will enrich our knowledge of evolution, sustainable agriculture, and genetic diversity and conservation. Over the 10 years of the project, we have trained many new scientists at all levels and generated key resources for the public, teachers, and scientific researchers.

      Switchgrass ESTs and SNPs

        As part of our project, “Developing Association Mapping in Polyploid Perennial Biofuel Grasses” (DOE-USDA Plant Feedstock Genomics for Bioenergy Program grant DE-A102-07ER64454)*, two SNP discovery initiatives were carried out. The earlier one (2009) was an approach based on EST sequences. The latest initiative (2011-12) adopted a more powerful approach, based on GBS (Genotyping by Sequencing). We believe that the SNP markers identified in these studies will greatly enhance breeding efforts that target the improvement of key biofuel traits and the development of new switchgrass cultivars.

        Data from: Gas emissions from dairy barnyards

          To assess the magnitude of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes, nutrient runoff and leaching from dairy barnyards and to characterize factors controlling these fluxes, nine barnyards were built at the U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center Farm in Prairie du Sac, WI (latitude 43.33N, longitude 89.71W). The barnyards were designed to simulate outdoor cattle-holding areas on commercial dairy farms in Wisconsin. Each barnyard was approximately 7m x 7m; areas of barnyards 1-9 were 51.91, 47.29, 50.97, 46.32, 45.64, 46.30, 48.93, 48.78, 46.73 square meters, respectively. Factors investigated included three different surface materials (bark, sand, soil) and timing of cattle corralling. Each barnyard included a gravity drainage system that allowed leachate to be pumped out and analyzed. Each soil-covered barnyard also included a system to intercept runoff at the perimeter and drain to a pumping port, similar to the leachate systems.

          Low-Disturbance Manure Incorporation

            The LDMI experiment (Low-Disturbance Manure Incorporation) was designed to evaluate nutrient losses with conventional and improved liquid dairy manure management practices in a corn silage (*Zea mays*) / rye cover-crop (*Secale cereale*) system. The improved manure management treatments were designed to incorporate manure while maintaining crop residue for erosion control. Field observations included greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes from soil, soil nutrient concentrations, crop growth and harvest biomass and nutrient content, as well as monitoring of soil physical and chemical properties. Observations from LDMI have been used for parameterization and validation of computer simulation models of GHG emissions from dairy farms (Gaillard et al., submitted). The LDMI experiment was performed as part of the Dairy CAP.

            Manure application methods for alfalfa-grass

              The MAMA experiment (Manure Application Methods for Alfalfa-Grass), from the USDA-ARS research station in Marshfield, WI was designed to evaluate nutrient and pathogen losses with conventional and improved liquid dairy manure management practices for alfalfa-grass production. Observations from MAMA have also been used for parameterization and validation of computer simulation models of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from dairy farms.

              Weevils of North America (WoNA)

                The Weevils of North America (WoNA) (http://symbiota4.acis.ufl.edu/scan/portal/checklists/checklist.php?cl=1) is an emerging resource for occurrence information, habitus photographs, legacy descriptions, and interactive identification keys for the almost 400 genera and 3300 species of weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea) in North America.