U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Data on Pregnancy rates, calf weaning weights, and sale prices on the University of Nevada Agricultural Experiment Station’s Gund Ranch from 2008-2020

    The University of Nevada Agricultural Experiment Station’s Gund Ranch near Austin, Nevada is approximately 100,000 acres with grazing by 325 cow-calf pairs. Cows are mostly Angus (80%) and Hereford (20%). Bulls are Angus X Hereford. Calves are mostly Angus with some black baldies. Cattle graze a Bureau of Land Management (BLM) grazing permit from April through July. Calving starts about mid-April. Branding is planned for 90-100 days after birth with bull calves castrated as this time. Privately-owned meadows are grazed July-September with weaning starting on September 15. Cows are grazed on BLM low elevation shrublands and weaned calves are kept in meadows with supplemental hay feeding on the Gund Ranch from October 1st through January 1st. The calves not kept for replacements are gathered and weighed for a total herd weight and shipped approximately the 1st of November. The larger end of the steers and heifers typically range from 475-490 pounds. Around 100 head are loaded onto a semi to achieve a full truckload of 48,000-50,0000 pounds. The smaller end of the steers and heifers are shipped on a second semi load. Weights are decreased with a 2% shrink calculation. In Nevada, there are only two sale barns, so many ranches receive more money by selling semi loads shipped to grazinglands of buyers’ choice. Calves are primarily sold on the internet go through Roundup Cattle Company. In years with drought conditions, calves may not reach the 48,000-50,000 weight limit for a second truck. Thus, the smaller calves can be marketed through a local sale barn at a one of their special calf sales.

    27 years of livestock production data under different stocking rate levels at the Central Grasslands Research Extension Center near Streeter, North Dakota

      The effects of stocking rate on livestock performance and profitability were monitored on 12 pastures at the Central Grasslands Research Extension Center (CGREC) near Streeter, ND from 1989 through 2015. These data were produced from an investigation of how the impacts of grazing intensity on native range, in addition an economic component, was included to determine grazing intensity effect on animal production.

      Data from: Profile of the Spleen Transcriptome in Beef Steers with Variation in Gain and Feed Intake

        This study examines the spleen in beef steers, a major lymphatic organ near the digestive tract, to determine whether it was also influencing individual feed efficiency status through immune responses. A total of 1216 genes were identified as differentially expressed. Data suggests the splenic contribution to some of the underlying variation among gain and intake may be a result of immune function and stress response. In addition, some of the differences in immune response functions may be related to gene copy number.

        Animal Transportation Database for Beef Cattle

          Currently, there are inaccuracies in the energy use and greenhouse gas emission estimates of cattle transport reported by LCA studies because of their simplistic assumptions. The purpose of this database is to provide the necessary data for accurate estimation of the energy use and greenhouse gas emissions associated with cattle transport. The database has 28 different trailers under three categories namely pot belly, gooseneck, and bumper pull. It describes space available (length and width), maximum weight allowed in the trailer, along with a compatible vehicle that can haul the trailer. Gross vehicle weight, maximum payload allowed, and fuel use are available for the compatible vehicle. Using this database one can directly identify the number of cattle of a particular weight category that can be transported in a particular trailer-vehicle combination. This database also helps to identify economical and eco-friendly ways to transport cattle.

          SPUR2

            SPUR2 DOS ver. 2.2 is a general grassland ecosystem simulation model designed to determine beef cattle performance and production by simultaneously simulating production of up to 15 plant species on 36 heterogeneous grassland sites. SPUR2 simulates grassland hydrology, nitrogen cycling, and soil organic matter on grazed ecosystems as well as rangeland production under different climatic regimes, environmental conditions, and management alternatives.

            Product System Model for Beef Production 2011

              Product system boundaries (cow-calf-finisher, CCF) include all material and energy flows associated with crop production and live cattle operations. Cattle inventory flows include the cow-calf operation and end with market weight finisher cattle and culls resulting from one full year of operation. The total live weight produced in one year is 2914841.44 kg and is comprised of the following animals: Finished cattle: 3724 (581 kg/finisher), Culled cows: 1156 (636 kg/cow), Culled bulls: 58 (908 kg/cow). These data were developed using Integrated Farm System Model and are intended to represent the MARC cattle operation in Nebraska in 2011. The data were a product of a project funded by the National Cattleman's Beef Association.

              Organic Beef Data from Integration of Crops and Livestock Project

                As the organic forage-finished beef industry continues to grow, it is important to understand factors that affect meat quality, characteristics of beef that influence human health, and sensory attributes of cooked beef. Research on alternative breeds and forage types that influence meat quality, FA and AA profiles, and sensory attributes in an organic forage-finished production system, as well as comparisons with alternative breeds is lacking. Data release is part of data management plan with USDA-NIFA funding. Data is from organic dairy beef steers collected at the West Central Research and Outreach Center, Morris, MN.