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2DLEAF

    A 2D mechanistic model of CO2 and water vapor movement in a leaf and photosynthesis.

    PhotoSim

      This program models the photosynthetic response of 13 floriculture crops to light, temperature, or carbon dioxide (CO2) and allows users to estimate the impact of adjusting their greenhouse environment. You can predict the impact on photosynthesis for different management changes (shading, supplemental high pressure sodium lighting, CO2 injection,or heating or cooling).

      RZWQM2

        Root Zone Water Quality Model 2 (RZWQM2) is a whole-system model for studying crop production and environmental quality under current and changing climate conditions. It emphasizes the effects of agricultural management practices on physical, chemical and biological processes. RZWQM2 is a one-dimensional model with a pseudo 2-dimensional drainage flow. Crop simulation options include the generic plant growth model, DSSAT-CSM 4.0 and HERMES SUCROS models. It also can simulate surface energy balance with components from the SHAW model and water erosion from the GLEAMS model. An automated parameter estimation algorithm (PEST) was added to RZWQM2 for objective model calibration and uncertainty analysis.

        UNSATCHEM

          Simulates water, heat, carbon dioxide and solute movement in one-dimensional variably saturated media.

          WEPPCAT

            WEPPCAT is a web-based erosion simulation tool that allows for the assessment of changes in erosion rates as a consequence of user-defined climate change scenarios. This tool is based on the USDA-ARS Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) erosion model.

            Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Croplands

              This download provides three datasets aggregated from the original output of the 172 crops; total emissions from croplands, per kilocalorie emissions from croplands and per food kilocalorie emissions from cropland.

              Dairy Gas Emissions Model (DairyGEM)

                The Dairy Gas Emissions Model (DairyGEM) uses process level simulation and process related emission factors to predict ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, VOC and greenhouse gas emissions along with the carbon, energy and water footprints of dairy production systems.

                Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model

                  Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model is a cropping systems model that was developed to estimate soil productivity as affected by erosion. EPIC simulates approximately eighty crops with one crop growth model using unique parameter values for each crop. It can be configured for a wide range of crop rotations and other vegetative systems, tillage systems, and other management strategies. It predicts effects of management decisions on soil, water, nutrient and pesticide movements, and their combined impact on soil loss, water quality, and crop yields for areas with homogeneous soils and management.

                  Data from: Gas emissions from dairy barnyards

                    To assess the magnitude of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes, nutrient runoff and leaching from dairy barnyards and to characterize factors controlling these fluxes, nine barnyards were built at the U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center Farm in Prairie du Sac, WI (latitude 43.33N, longitude 89.71W). The barnyards were designed to simulate outdoor cattle-holding areas on commercial dairy farms in Wisconsin. Each barnyard was approximately 7m x 7m; areas of barnyards 1-9 were 51.91, 47.29, 50.97, 46.32, 45.64, 46.30, 48.93, 48.78, 46.73 square meters, respectively. Factors investigated included three different surface materials (bark, sand, soil) and timing of cattle corralling. Each barnyard included a gravity drainage system that allowed leachate to be pumped out and analyzed. Each soil-covered barnyard also included a system to intercept runoff at the perimeter and drain to a pumping port, similar to the leachate systems.

                    Low-Disturbance Manure Incorporation

                      The LDMI experiment (Low-Disturbance Manure Incorporation) was designed to evaluate nutrient losses with conventional and improved liquid dairy manure management practices in a corn silage (*Zea mays*) / rye cover-crop (*Secale cereale*) system. The improved manure management treatments were designed to incorporate manure while maintaining crop residue for erosion control. Field observations included greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes from soil, soil nutrient concentrations, crop growth and harvest biomass and nutrient content, as well as monitoring of soil physical and chemical properties. Observations from LDMI have been used for parameterization and validation of computer simulation models of GHG emissions from dairy farms (Gaillard et al., submitted). The LDMI experiment was performed as part of the Dairy CAP.