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Weighing Lysimeter Data for The Bushland, Texas Maize for Grain Datasets

    This dataset consists of six years of weighing lysimeter data for six seasons of maize grown for grain at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Laboratory (CPRL), Soil and Water Management Research Unit (SWMRU), Bushland, Texas (Lat. 35.186714°, Long. -102.094189°, elevation 1170 m above MSL) for 1989, 1990, 1994, 2013, 2016, and 2018. Maize was grown on four large, precision weighing lysimeters, each in the center of a 4.44 ha square field. The datasets for individual season years consist of soil water content, weather, crop growth and yield, agronomic calendar, water balance (evapotranspiration, precipitation, dew/frost, irrigation), and lysimeter energy and water balance data. This particular dataset contains lysimeter soil water storage and drainage data, and data from in-soil and above-soil sensors. Properties sensed included wind speed, air temperature and relative humidity, components of the radiation balance (e.g., net radiation, incoming and reflected shortwave, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), incoming and reflected longwave, thermal infrared emitted by the plant/soil surface), soil heat flux, soil temperature, and soil volumetric water content at certain depths. Not all properties where always sensed in any one year.

    Growth and Yield Data for the Bushland, Texas Maize for Grain Datasets

      This dataset consists of growth and yield data for six seasons of maize grown for grain at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Laboratory (CPRL), Soil and Water Management Research Unit (SWMRU), Bushland, Texas (Lat. 35.186714°, Long. -102.094189°, elevation 1170 m above MSL) for 1989, 1990, 1994, 2013, 2016, and 2018. Maize was grown on four large, precision weighing lysimeters, each in the center of a 4.44 ha square field. The entire datasets for individual season years consist of soil water content, weather, crop growth and yield, agronomic calendar, water balance (evapotranspiration, precipitation, dew/frost, irrigation), and lysimeter energy and water balance data. This dataset focuses on the maize growth and yield data.

      Standard Weather Data for the Bushland, Texas, Large Weighing Lysimeter Experiments

        This dataset consists of weather data for six seasons of maize grown for grain at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Laboratory (CPRL), Soil and Water Management Research Unit (SWMRU), Bushland, Texas (Lat. 35.186714°, Long. -102.094189°, elevation 1170 m above MSL) for 1989, 1990, 1994, 2013, 2016, and 2018. Maize was grown on four large, precision weighing lysimeters, each in the center of a 4.44 ha square field. The entire datasets for individual season years consist of soil water content, weather, crop growth and yield, agronomic calendar, water balance (evapotranspiration, precipitation, dew/frost, irrigation), and lysimeter energy and water balance data. This dataset focuses on the weather data

        Agronomic Calendars for the Bushland, Texas Maize for Grain Datasets

          This dataset consists of agronomic calendars for six seasons of maize grown for grain at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Laboratory (CPRL), Soil and Water Management Research Unit (SWMRU), Bushland, Texas (Lat. 35.186714°, Long. -102.094189°, elevation 1170 m above MSL) for 1989, 1990, 1994, 2013, 2016, and 2018. Maize was grown on four large, precision weighing lysimeters, each in the center of a 4.44 ha square field. The entire datasets for individual season years consist of soil water content, weather, crop growth and yield, agronomic calendar, water balance (evapotranspiration, precipitation, dew/frost, irrigation), and lysimeter energy and water balance data.

          Soil Water Content Data for The Bushland, Texas Large Weighing Lysimeter Experiments

            This dataset contains soil water content data developed from neutron probe readings taken in access tubes in each of the four large, precision weighing lysimeters and in the fields surrounding each lysimeter at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Laboratory (CPRL), Soil and Water Management Research Unit (SWMRU), Bushland, Texas (Lat. 35.186714°, Long. -102.094189°, elevation 1170 m above MSL) beginning in 1989. Readings were taken periodically with a field-calibrated neutron probe at depths from 10 cm to 230 cm (maximum of 190 cm depth in the lysimeters) in 20-cm depth increments. Periods between readings were typically one to two weeks, sometimes longer according to experimental design and need for data. Field calibrations in the Pullman soil series were done every few years. Calibrations typically produced a regression equation with RMSE <= 0.01 m3 m-3. Data were used to guide irrigation scheduling to achieve full or deficit irrigation as required by the experimental design.

            The Bushland, Texas Maize for Grain Datasets

              This parent dataset links to six seasons of datasets on maize grown for grain at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Laboratory (CPRL), Soil and Water Management Research Unit (SWMRU), Bushland, Texas (Lat. 35.186714°, Long. -102.094189°, elevation 1170 m above MSL) for 1989, 1990, 1994, 2013, 2016, and 2018. Maize was grown on four large, precision weighing lysimeters, each in the center of a 4.44 ha square field. The datasets for individual season years consist of soil water content, weather, crop growth and yield, agronomic calendar, water balance (evapotranspiration, precipitation, dew/frost, irrigation), and lysimeter energy and water balance data.

              Data from: Plant strategies for maximizing growth during drought and drought recovery in Solanum melongena L. (eggplant)

                This data represents the collection of physiological and biometric data of above- and below-ground plant traits in four species of Solanum melongena of Philippine origin (PHL 4841, PHL 2778, PHL 2789, and Mara). Half of the plants were subjected to significant water deficit, and half again of those deficit plants were allowed to recover after subsequent watering. This data is suitable to serve as a benchmark for trait values in S. melongena, as well as in studies of trait responses to terminal drought and episodic drought in agricultural settings.

                Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, Idaho (Lysimeter)

                  Lysimeters are instruments that measure water and/or solute movement in soils. The primary purpose for these lysimeters was to measure evapotranspiration (ET); these data describe changes in soil water during the snow-free season. In addition to measuring changes in total soil water, soil water content profiles and soil temperature profiles were measured within or adjacent to the lysimeters and are reported. Two pairs of soil lysimeters were installed in the RCEW in 1967, one pair at the Lower Sheep Creek climate station (designated the east and west lysimeters), separated, center to center, by 3.6 m, and the other pair at the Reynolds Mountain climate station (designated north and south), separated by 4.7 m. These lysimeters were hydraulic weighing lysimeters in which an inner cylindrical tank containing soil is set within a slightly larger outer cylinder.

                  Metadata for: Climate-driven prediction of land water storage anomalies: An outlook for water resources monitoring across the conterminous United States

                    These research data are associated with the manuscript entitled “Climate-driven prediction of land water storage anomalies: An outlook for water resources monitoring across the conterminous United States” (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2020.125053). The study focused on the conterminous United States (CONUS) which extends over a region of contrasting climates with an uneven distribution of freshwater resources. Under climate change, an exacerbation of the contrast between dry and wet regions is expected across the CONUS and could drastically affect local ecosystems, agriculture practices, and communities. Hence, efforts to better understand long-term spatial and temporal patterns of freshwater resources are needed to plan and anticipate responses. Since 2002, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and GRACE Follow-On (GRACE-FO) satellite observations provide estimates of large-scale land water storage changes with an unprecedented accuracy. However, the limited lifetime and observation gaps of the GRACE mission have sparked research interest for GRACE-like data reconstruction. This study developed a predictive modeling approach to quantify monthly land liquid water equivalence thickness anomaly (LWE) using climate variables including total precipitation (PRE), number of wet day (WET), air temperature (TMP), and potential evapotranspiration (PET). The approach builds on the achievements of the GRACE mission by determining LWE footprints using a multivariate regression on principal components model with lag signals. The performance evaluation of the model with a lag signals consideration shows 0.5 ≤ R2 ≤ 0.8 for 41.2% of the CONUS. However, the model’s predictive power is unevenly distributed. The model could be useful for predicting and monitoring freshwater resources anomalies for the locations with high model performances. The processed data used as inputs in the study are here provided including the GIS files of the different maps reported. Data reported in the csv files are 0.5-degree gridded monthly time-series of Land water Equivalence anomalies (USlwe163.csv), Potential evapotranspiration (USpet163.csv), Precipitation (USpre163.csv), above-ground air temperature (UStmp163.csv), and number of wet days (USwet163.csv) for 163 consecutive months over the period 2002 to 2017.