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Columbia River National Scenic Area GIS (Geographic Information Systems) Data

    This page contains metadata, or data about data, for our spatial data sets. The data sets are organized by theme which are shown in the table of contents frame. For example, if you are interested in a data set that has to do with water, just click on the water link in the table of contents. Then click on the name of the data set of interest to view the data dictionary. Each data dictionary will explain geographic information about the data set, who the data steward is, how the data set was built, and other associated information. It will also describe the database tables that are associated with the data set. Please contact the data steward (if noted) if you have questions about the content of the data. Their phone number is included within the data dictionary. The export files are shapefiles or geodatabases that have been compressed with WinZip. Projection is a local Albers projection defined for the area of Oregon and Washington in Region 6 of the Forest Service, NAD 83, units are in meters.

    Northern Region (Region 1) Geospatial Data

      The Northern Region (R1) of the U.S. Forest Service uses ArcGIS Online to share maps, data, and applications for use by other federal agencies, partners, and the public. This gallery displays some of the web map applications developed by the Region and our Forests.

      Rocky Mountain Region (Region 2) Geospatial Data

        Our geographic area of responsibility covers Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming. The datasets presented here are derived from the USFS Land Status Records System (LSRS) and the USFS infrastructure database (Infra), and other current projects of a region wide nature, then processed using ArcMap and Google™ Earth Pro.

        Southwestern Region (Region 3) Geospatial Data

          The Southwestern Region is 20.6 million acres. There are six national forests in Arizona, five national forests and a national grassland in New Mexico, and one national grassland each in Oklahoma and the Texas panhandle.The region ranges in elevation from 1,600 feet above sea level and an annual rain fall of 8 inches in Arizona's lower Sonoran Desert to 13,171-foot high Wheeler Peak and over 35 inches of precipitation a year in northern New Mexico.

          Pacific Southwest Region (Region 5) Geospatial Data

            The Pacific Southwest Region has geospatial datasets available for download from this website. These datasets are zipped personal or file geodatabases created using ESRI ArcGis 10.0 software. Additional descriptive information as well as data steward contact information, for each geodatabase, can be found under the metadata link.

            Pacific Northwest Region (Region 6) Geospatial Data

              The Pacific Northwest Region (Region 6) of the US Forest Service contains 17 National Forests, two National Scenic Areas, a National Grassland, and two National Volcanic Monuments, all within the States of Oregon and Washington. These national forests provide timber for people, forage for cattle and wildlife, habitat for fish, plants, and animals, and some of the finest recreation lands in the country. This database contains links to the Pacific Northwest Forests with GIS data currently available online.

              FSGeodata Clearinghouse

                The USDA Forest Service Geodata Clearinghouse is an online collection of digital data related to forest resources. Through the Clearinghouse you can find datasets related to forests and grasslands, including boundaries and ownership, natural resources, roads and trails, as well as datasets related to State and private forested areas, including insect and disease threat and surface water importance. You can also find downloadable map products, raster data, and links to other sources of forest resource information.

                Early Detection Rapid Response Database

                  Non-native bark and ambrosia beetles are a serious threat to our nation’s urban and rural forests. In 2007, Forest Health Protection began implementation of an early detection and rapid response project for non-native bark and ambrosia beetles. An Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) Team (consisting of Forest Service, APHIS, university and state representatives) has developed a framework for implementing a national, interagency detection, monitoring, and response system for these insects. This framework involves the cooperation of state partners, regional taxonomists and regional Forest Service staff. Participating states will be responsible for following project protocols with funding from the Forest Service.