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Small Watershed Hydrology (WinTR-55)

    WinTR-55 is a single-event rainfall-runoff small watershed hydrologic model. The model generates hydrographs from both urban and agricultural areas and at selected points along the stream system. Hydrographs are routed downstream through channels and/or reservoirs. Multiple sub-areas can be modeled within the watershed.

    SITES

      Prioritization of dam rehabilitation, improved flood warning systems, development of emergency action plans, and inform policy makers on zoning regulations.

      KINEROS - The kinematic runoff and erosion model

        The kinematic runoff and erosion model KINEROS is an event oriented, physically based model describing the processes of interception, infiltration, surface runoff and erosion from small agricultural and urban watersheds. The watershed is represented by a cascade of planes and channels; the partial differential equations describing overland flow, channel flow, erosion and sediment transport are solved by finite difference techniques. The spatial variation of rainfall, infiltration, runoff, and erosion parameters can be accomodated. KINEROS may be used to determine the effects of various artificial features such as urban developments, small detention reservoirs, or lined channels on flood hydrographs and sediment yield.

        Data from: Threshold Behavior of Catchments with Duplex Hillslope Soils Feeding Soil Pipe Networks

          This dataset corresponds with two published studies conducted on loess covered catchments in northern Mississippi, USA within the Goodwin Creek Experimental Watershed that contain extensive networks of soil pipes and corresponding collapse features. These loess soils contain fragipan layers that were found to perch water, thereby initiating the piping processes. The dataset contains data from two papers, specifically these include: (i) the spatial distribution of soil pipe collapses and their size measurements from the Wilson et al. (2015) paper, and (ii) hydrologic measurements of perched water tables on hillslopes, water levels of selected soil pipe locations, and precipitation from the Wilson et al. (2017) paper.