Data from: Range size, local abundance and effect inform species descriptions at scales relevant for local conservation practice

This study describes how metrics defining invasions may be more broadly applied to both native and invasive species in vegetation management, supporting their relevance to local scales of species conservation and management. A sample monitoring dataset is used to compare range size, local abundance and effect as well as summary calculations of landscape penetration (range size × local abundance) and impact (landscape penetration × effect) for native and invasive species in the mixed-grass plant community of western North Dakota, USA.

Agroecosystems & Environment

Shawnee National Forest Geospatial Data

GIS data is available on the Forest’s FTP site in the form of “shape files” or layers and is available free for downloading. To utilize these data layers you will need a program that uses the Geographic Information System (GIS) such as ESRI’s ArcMap, ArcView or the free map reading program ArcGIS Explorer. ArcGIS Explorer has tools that let you zoom in/out, print the map, and query data. It also has map tips to identify features, and a help menu. Included is a list of GIS data files available for the Shawnee National Forest. These GIS data files are updated on a continuing basis.

Maps and Multimedia

Data from: Population structure and genetic diversity within the endangered species Pityopsis ruthii (Asteraceae)

Pityopsis ruthii (Ruth’s golden aster) is a federally endangered herbaceous perennial endemic to the Hiwassee and Ocoee Rivers in southeastern Tennessee, USA. Comprehensive genetic studies providing novel information to conservationists for preservation of the species are lacking. Genetic variation and gene flow were evaluated for 814 individuals from 33 discrete locations using polymorphic microsatellites: seven chloroplast and twelve nuclear. A total of 198 alleles were detected with the nuclear loci and 79 alleles with the chloroplast loci.

Genomics and Genetics

Data from: Effects of conifer treatments on soil nutrient availability and plant composition in sagebrush steppe

Conifer control in sagebrush steppe of the western United States causes various levels of site disturbance influencing vegetation recovery and resource availability. The data set presented in this article include growing season availability of soil micronutrients and levels of total soil carbon, organic matter, and N spanning a six year period following western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis spp. occidentalis) reduction by mechanical cutting and prescribed fire of western juniper woodlands in southeast Oregon. These data can be useful to further evaluate the impacts of conifer woodland reduction to soil resources in sagebrush steppe plant communities.

Agroecosystems & Environment