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Orussus abietinus mitochondrial genome assembly

    The Baylor College of Medicine has sequenced and annotated the Orussus abietinus genome as part of the i5k pilot project. This dataset represents a targeted assembly and annotation of the mitochondrial genome.

    Athalia rosae mitochondrial genome assembly

      The Baylor College of Medicine has sequenced and annotated the Athalia rosae genome as part of the i5k pilot project. This dataset represents a separate targeted assembly of the mitochondrial genome.

      Genome analysis of the ubiquitous boxwood pathogen Pseudonectria foliicola: A small fungal genome with an increased cohort of genes associated with loss of virulence

        Boxwood plants are affected by many different diseases caused by fungi. Some boxwood diseases are deadly and quickly kill the infected plants, but with others, the plant can survive and even thrive when infected. The fungus that causes volutella blight is the most common of these weak boxwood pathogens. Even the healthiest boxwood plants are infected by the volutella fungus, and often there are no signs that the plants are hurt by the infection. In order to understand why the volutella blight fungus is such a weak pathogen and to understand the genetic mechanisms it uses to interact with boxwood, the complete genome of the volutella fungus was sequenced and characterized. These datasets are generated from the genome sequence of *Pseudonectria foliicola*, strain ATCC13545, the fungus responsible for volutella disease of boxwood. Datasets include the nuclear genome and mitochondrial genome assemblies (sequenced using Illumina technology), the predicted gene model dataset generated using MAKER, the multiple sequence alignment of single-copy orthologs used for phylogenetic analysis, CMAP files generated from SimpleSynteny analysis of mitogenomes, and high quality photographic images.

        Data from: Genomic analyses of dominant US clonal lineages of Phytophthora infestans reveals a shared ancestry for US11 and US18 and a lack of recently shared ancestry for all other US lineages

          The populations of the potato and tomato late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, in the US are well known for emerging repeatedly as novel clonal lineages. These successions of dominant clones have historically been named US1 through US24, in order of appearance, since their first characterization using molecular markers. Hypothetically, these lineages can emerge by descent from prior lineages or as novel, independent lineages.