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AgBase

    [AgBase](https://agbase.arizona.edu/index.html) Version 2.0 is a curated, open-source, Web-accessible resource for functional analysis of agricultural plant and animal gene products including gene ontology annotations. Its long-term goal is to serve the needs of the agricultural research communities by facilitating post-genome biology for agriculture researchers and for those researchers primarily using agricultural species as biomedical models. AgBase uses controlled vocabularies developed by the Gene Ontology (GO) Consortium to describe molecular function, biological process, and cellular component for genes and gene products in agricultural species.

    Data from: Genome of the small hive beetle (Aethina tumida, Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), a worldwide parasite of social bee colonies, provides insights into detoxification and herbivory

      The small hive beetle (Aethina tumida, ATUMI) is an invasive parasite of bee colonies. ATUMI feeds on both fruits and bee nest products, facilitating its spread and increasing its impact on honey bees and other pollinators. The ATUMI genome has been sequenced and annotated, providing the first genomic resources for this species and for the Nitidulidae.

      Data from: The assembled transcriptome of the adult horn fly, Haematobia irritans

        To better understand the adult horn fly, *Haematobia irritans irritans*, and the development of resistance in natural populations, an Illumina paired-end read HiSeq and GAII approach was used to determine the transcriptomes of untreated control adult females, untreated control adult males, permethrin-treated surviving adult males and permethrin + piperonyl butoxide-treated killed adult males from a Louisiana population of horn flies with a moderate level of pyrethroid resistance.

        National Invertebrate Genetic Resources

          Insects impact American agriculture both as destructive and beneficial organisms. Insect pests, parasites, predators, products, and pollinators are all economically important. It is critically important to distinguish between different species, races, stocks, strains, biotypes, and other genetic entities and to document their different interactions with agriculture and the environment. The goals of the National Invertebrate Genetic Resources Program include: 1. Preservation of reference specimens 2. Maintenance of genetically important germplasm 3. Documentation of specific insect stocks 4. Management of databases 5. Distribution of material to researchers and breeders.