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IncA-C Alignment

    IncA/C plasmids are a class of plasmids from Enterobacteraciae that are relatively large (49 to >180 kbp), are readily transferred by conjugation, and carry multiple antimicrobial resistance genes. Reconstruction of the phylogeny of these plasmids has been difficult because of the high rate of remodeling by recombination-mediated horizontal gene transfer (HGT). We hypothesized that evaluation of nucleotide polymorphisms relative to the rate of HGT would help to develop a clock to show if anthropic practices have had significant influences on the lineages of the plasmid. A system was developed to rapidly sequence up to 191 known open27 reading-frames from each of 39 recently isolated IncA/C plasmids from a diverse panel of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli. With these data plus sequences from Genbank we were able to distinguish six distinct lineages that had extremely low numbers of polymorphisms within each lineage, especially among the largest group designated as Lineage 1. Two regions, each about half the plasmid in size, could be distinguished with a separate lineal pattern. The distribution of Lineage 1 showed that it has migrated extremely rapidly with fewer polymorphisms than can be expected in two-thousand years. Remodeling by frequent HGT was evident with a pattern that appeared to have the highest rate just upstream of the putative conjugation origin of transfer (ori-T). It seems likely that when an IncA/C plasmid is transferred also adjacent to a multiple antimicrobial resistance gene cassette.

    Data from: Draft genome sequences of eight streptogramin-resistant Enterococcus species isolates from animal and environmental sources in the United States

      Draft genome sequences of five *Enterococcus faecium*, two *Enterococcus hirae*, and one *Enterococcus gallinarum* from enviromental sources and chicken carcass rinsates. Isolates were selected for their resistance to the streptogramin antibiotic, Quinupristin-Dalfopristin and were all collected in the United States between 2001 and 2004. Antimicrobial resistance genes were identified conferring resistance to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramins, aminoglycosides, tetracycline, beta-lactams, and glycopeptides.

      Data from: Genetic Architecture of Resistance to Stripe Rust in a Global Winter Wheat Germplasm Collection

        Virulence shifts in populations of *Puccinia striiformis* f. sp. *tritici* (*Pst*), the causal pathogen of wheat stripe rust, are a major challenge to resistance breeding. The majority of known resistance genes are already ineffective against current races of *Pst*, necessitating the identification and introgression of new sources of resistance. Germplasm core collections that reflect the range of genetic and phenotypic diversity of crop species are ideal platforms for examining the genetic architecture of complex traits such as resistance to stripe rust. We report the results of genetic characterization and genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) for resistance to stripe rust in a core subset of 1175 accessions in the National Small Grains Collection (NSGC) winter wheat germplasm collection, based on genotyping with the wheat 9K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) iSelect assay and phenotyping of seedling and adult plants under natural disease epidemics in four environments.