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Data from: Effect of Source on Trust of Pulse Nutrition Information and Perceived Likelihood of Following Dietary Guidance

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how information source (control—no source, USDA, fictitious hospital, or fictitious social media) impacts perceptions of diet information. Participants included 943 American adults who were aged 18-74 years and were recruited from across the United States through Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk). ANOVA results indicated that the USDA and hospital sources were perceived as more accurate, trustworthy, reliable, and more desirable to learn more from relative to control and social media. There were no differences in likelihood of following guidance depending on source.

    WIC Infant and Toddler Feeding Practices Study-2 (WIC ITFPS-2): Prenatal, Infant Year, Second Year, Third Year, and Fourth Year Datasets

      The WIC Infant and Toddler Feeding Practices Study–2 (WIC ITFPS-2) addresses a series of research questions regarding feeding practices, the effect of WIC services on those practices, and the health and nutrition outcomes of children on WIC. These datasets include data from caregivers and their children during the prenatal period and during the children’s first four years of life (child ages 1 to 48 months).

      Data from: Chapter 5: Energy Use in Agriculture. U.S. Agriculture and Forestry Greenhouse Gas Inventory: 1990-2018

        The report 'U.S. Agriculture and Forestry Greenhouse Gas Inventory: 1990-2018' serves to estimate U.S. GHG emissions for the agricultural sector, to quantify uncertainty in emission estimates, and to estimate the potential of agriculture to mitigate U.S. GHG emissions. This dataset contains tabulated data from the figures and tables presented in Chapter 5, Energy Use in Agriculture, of the report. Data are presented for carbon dioxide emissions from on-farm energy use. Please refer to the report for full descriptions of and notes on the data.

        Data from: Chapter 4: Carbon Stocks & Stock Changes in U.S. Forests. U.S. Agriculture and Forestry Greenhouse Gas Inventory: 1990-2018

          The report 'U.S. Agriculture and Forestry Greenhouse Gas Inventory: 1990-2018' serves to estimate U.S. GHG emissions for the agricultural sector, to quantify uncertainty in emission estimates, and to estimate the potential of agriculture to mitigate U.S. GHG emissions. This dataset contains tabulated data from the figures and tables presented in Chapter 4, Carbon Stocks & Stock Changes in U.S. Forests, of the report. Data are presented for above and below-ground carbon stocks and stock changes.

          Data from: Chapter 3: Cropland Agriculture. U.S. Agriculture and Forestry Greenhouse Gas Inventory: 1990-2018

            The primary greenhouse gas (GHG) sources for agriculture are nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from cropped and grazed soils, methane (CH4) emissions from ruminant livestock production and rice cultivation, and CH4 and N2O emissions from managed livestock waste. This dataset contains tabulated data from the figures and tables presented in Chapter 3, Cropland Agriculture, of the report. Data are presented for Cropland Soils (N2O), Rice Cultivation + Residue Burning (CH4 + N2O), and Agricultural Soil Carbon and Amendments (CO2).

            Data from: Chapter 2- Livestock and Grazed Lands Emissions. U.S. Agriculture and Forestry Greenhouse Gas Inventory: 1990-2018

              The primary greenhouse gas (GHG) sources for agriculture are nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from cropped and grazed soils, methane (CH4) emissions from ruminant livestock production and rice cultivation, and CH4 and N2O emissions from managed livestock waste. This dataset contains tabulated data from the figures and tables presented in Chapter 2, Livestock and Grazed Lands Emissions, of the report. This chapter covers carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide emissions and removals due to enteric fermentation, animal waste management, and land use for confined and grazed animals.

              Data from: Chapter 1, Introduction. U.S. Agriculture and Forestry Greenhouse Gas Inventory: 1990-2018

                The primary greenhouse gas (GHG) sources for agriculture are nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from cropped and grazed soils, methane (CH4) emissions from ruminant livestock production and rice cultivation, and CH4 and N2O emissions from managed livestock waste. This dataset contains tabulated data from the figures and tables presented in Chapter 1, Introduction, of the report. Data are presented for Cropland Soils (N2O), Enteric Fermentation (CH4), Managed Livestock Waste (CH4 + N2O), Grazed Lands (CH4 + N2O), Rice Cultivation + Residue Burning (CH4 + N2O), Energy Use, Forests, Harvested Wood, Urban Trees, and Agricultural Soils.

                Agricultural land use by field: Upper Mississippi River Basin 2010-2020

                  This database is structured around individual farm fields as the unit of record, providing a framework that enables land use to be assessed at the same scale that agricultural land uses shift, at an annual time step, and at the scale at which conservation practices are implemented. It is beneficial to document agricultural land cover and its rates of change to understand responses of watershed, landscape, and agroecosystem processes to changes in land use and to identify viable approaches that can be customized for local adoption and mitigate environmental impacts from agricultural production.

                  Agricultural land use by field: Nebraska 2010-2020

                    This database is structured around individual farm fields as the unit of record, providing a framework that enables land use to be assessed at the same scale that agricultural land uses shift, at an annual time step, and at the scale at which conservation practices are implemented. It is beneficial to document agricultural land cover and its rates of change to understand responses of watershed, landscape, and agroecosystem processes to changes in land use and to identify viable approaches that can be customized for local adoption and mitigate environmental impacts from agricultural production.