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    Spatial Modeling for Resources Framework (SMRF) was developed at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) in Boise, ID, and was designed to increase the flexibility of taking measured weather data and distributing the point measurements across a watershed.

    Automated Water Supply Model (AWSM)

      Automated Water Supply Model (AWSM) was developed at the USDA Agricultural Research Service in Boise, ID, to streamline the workflow used to forecast the water supply of multiple water basins.

      Spatial Modeling for Resources Framework (SMRF)

        Spatial Modeling for Resources Framework (SMRF) was developed at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) in Boise, ID, and was designed to increase the flexibility of taking measured weather data and distributing the point measurements across a watershed.

        NRCS Regional Conservation Partnership Program - Colorado River Basin

          Irrigated agriculture is vitally important to the economy and quality of life in many areas of the Colorado River Basin. It also accounts for a significant share of the basin’s existing water use, shared among 33 million people in the United States plus 3 million in Mexico. Faced with historic drought conditions and water supply pressures, farmers, ranchers, Indian tribes and other water users are in urgent need of accelerated conservation on working agricultural lands. This dataset includes a printer-friendly CCA map and shapefiles for GIS.

          NRCS Regional Conservation Partnership Program - Mississippi River Basin

            The Mississippi River is North America’s largest river, flowing over 2,300 miles through America’s heartland to the Gulf of Mexico. The watershed not only provides drinking water, food, industry, and recreation for millions of people, it also hosts a globally significant migratory flyway and home for over 325 bird species. This dataset includes a printer-friendly CCA map and shapefiles for GIS.

            APEX – Agricultural Policy/Environmental eXtender Model

              Agricultural Policy/Environmental eXtender (APEX) has components for routing water, sediment, nutrients, and pesticides across complex landscapes and channel systems to the watershed outlet as well as groundwater and reservoir components. A watershed can be subdivided as much as necessary to assure that each subarea is relatively homogeneous in terms of soil, land use, management, and weather. APEX was constructed to evaluate various land management strategies considering sustainability, erosion (wind, sheet, and channel), economics, water supply and quality, soil quality, plant competition, weather, and pests. The routing of water, sediment, nutrient, and pesticide capabilities are some of the most comprehensive available in current landscape-scale models and can be simulated between subareas and channel systems within the model. APEX can perform long-term continuous simulations for modeling the impacts of different nutrient management practices, tillage operations, conservation practices, alternative cropping systems, and other management practices on surface runoff and losses of sediment, nutrients, and other pollutant indicators.