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SWAGMAN-Whatif

    An interactive computer program was developed to simulate the interactions among the above factors. It shows how changing one factor impacts the outcome of the other factors for a single growing season. The user selects a climate, a crop, and soil characteristics from menu lists, and then sets the water table depth and quality, irrigation (river or well) water quality and then develops an irrigation schedule. On execution, the relative yield reductions due to over irrigation, under irrigation, and salinity, water table rise or fall and surface runoff are shown numerically for the growing season. Soil water content, soil salinity, water table depth changes and rain and irrigation events during the season are also shown graphically.

    PIVNOZ-PIPELOSS

      These two software programs have been developed to aid in the design and analysis of center pivot and traveling lateral sprinkler irrigation systems.

      Redapol

        A computer-based model simulating the interactions of weather, bloom and honey bee foraging activity that culminate in 'Delicious' apple fruit-set. The model predicts the percentage of blossoms setting fruit based upon weather conditions, orchard design, tree characteistics, and honey bee colonies per hectare.

        Bio-Control Parasite

          A model that simulates host and parasitoid population interactions, parasitism rates, and plant damage is described. BIOCONTROL-PARASITE can simulate many different species of phytophagus insects, parasitoids, and plants because specifics of the insect and plant biology are entered though menus at the beginning of a simulation.

          Resampling Validation of Sample Plans (RVSP)

            Sets of tools for sample plan evaluation originally released in 1997, these Monte Carlo simulations can be used to evaluate sampling models during the developmental phase; however, they may not be adequate for testing model validity and performance under field conditions. This is primarily due to the assumption of an underlying statistical distribution (e.g., negative-binomial, normal) which may not adequately represent the actual distributions of insects in all instances. Here we present a method in which actual field data is resampled to evaluate sample plan performance. We originally developed DOS-based computer software for this purpose.

            Cligen

              Cligen is a stochastic weather generator which produces daily estimates of precipitation, temperature, dewpoint, wind, and solar radiation for a single geographic point, using monthly parameters (means, SD's, skewness, etc.) derived from the historic measurements. Unlike other climate generators, it produces individual storm parameter estimates, including time to peak, peak intensity, and storm duration, which are required to run the WEPP and the WEPS soil erosion models.

              WEPPCAT

                WEPPCAT is a web-based erosion simulation tool that allows for the assessment of changes in erosion rates as a consequence of user-defined climate change scenarios. This tool is based on the USDA-ARS Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) erosion model.

                KINEROS - The kinematic runoff and erosion model

                  The kinematic runoff and erosion model KINEROS is an event oriented, physically based model describing the processes of interception, infiltration, surface runoff and erosion from small agricultural and urban watersheds. The watershed is represented by a cascade of planes and channels; the partial differential equations describing overland flow, channel flow, erosion and sediment transport are solved by finite difference techniques. The spatial variation of rainfall, infiltration, runoff, and erosion parameters can be accomodated. KINEROS may be used to determine the effects of various artificial features such as urban developments, small detention reservoirs, or lined channels on flood hydrographs and sediment yield.

                  Stream Temperature Modeling and Monitoring: Air Temperature Based Thermal Stream Habitat Model

                    The Air Temperature Based Thermal Stream Habitat Model was originally developed from weather station information across the Columbia River basin in the Pacific Northwest. Multiple regression was used to predict mean annual air temperatures from elevation, latitude, and longitude with good success R^2 ~ 0.89). The model was developed as an alternative to PRISM data interpolations based on spline surface smoothing and should more accurately represent thermal conditions in stream valleys.

                    Stream Temperature Modeling and Monitoring: Multiple Regression Stream Temperature Model

                      This simple Stream Temperature Modeling and Monitoring approach uses thermograph data and geomorphic predictor variables from GIS software and digital elevation models (DEM). Multiple regression models are used to predict stream temperature metrics throughout a stream network with moderate accuracy (R^2 ~ 0.65). The models can provide basic descriptions of spatial patterns in stream temperatures, suitable habitat distributions for aquatic species, or be used to assess temporal trends related to climate or management activities if multiple years of temperature data are available.