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Long Term Agroecosystem Research Overview

In pursuit of sustainable U.S. agriculture, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) launched the Long-Term Agroecosystem (LTAR) network. The LTAR network is composed of 18 locations distributed across the contiguous United States working together to address national and local agricultural priorities and advance the sustainable intensification of U.S. agriculture.

The LTAR network represents a range of major U.S. agroecosystems, including annual row cropping systems, grazinglands, and integrated systems representative of roughly 49 percent of cereal production, 30 percent of forage production, and 32 percent of livestock production in the United States. Furthermore, the LTAR sites span geographic and climatic gradients representing a variety of challenges and opportunities to U.S. agriculture.

The LTAR network uses experimentation and coordinated observations to develop a national roadmap for the sustainable intensification of agricultural production. While the LTAR network is a new network, experimentation and measurements began at some LTAR sites more than 100 years ago, while other locations started their research as recently as 19 years ago.

A primary goal of LTAR is to develop and to share science-based findings with producers and stakeholders. Tools, technologies, and management practices resulting from LTAR network science will be applied to the sustainable intensification of U.S. agriculture. Technical innovations, including new production techniques, genetics, and sensor infrastructure applied at the farm/ranch level can increase the capacity for adaptive management, reduce time and operational costs, and increase profits and the quality of life for producers.

For full list of LTAR sites, view the sites matrix at https://ltar.ars.usda.gov/sites/.

For more information about the LTAR network visit: https://ltar.ars.usda.gov

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Datasets

610 datasets

Data from: USDA ARS Northern Great Plains Research Laboratory (NGPRL) legacy livestock production (1916-2016) under various rangeland managements with stocking rate and seeded crested wheatgrass

    Established in 1912, the Northern Great Plains Research Laboratory (NGPRL) is a USDA Agricultural Research Service facility located in Mandan, Morton County, North Dakota. In 1916, NGPRL scientists established a long-term rangeland management research project focusing on developing the most appropriate stocking rates for rangelands in the region. The research project ran for 100 years and included pasture 62, a heavily stocked pasture, and 66, a moderately stocked pasture for the entire time. Also, in 1931, pasture 37 was converted from smooth bromegrass to crested wheatgrass, which was both lightly and moderately stocked. The legacy livestock production data from these pastures include 100 years (1916-2016) of livestock production data from pastures 62 and 66 and 84 years (1932-2016) from pasture 37.

    Gridded 20-Year Parameterization of a Stochastic Weather Generator (CLIGEN) for South American and African Continents at 0.25 Arc Degree Resolution

      CLImate GENerator (CLIGEN) is a stochastic weather generator that produces daily and sub-daily timeseries of weather variables. The resulting timeseries are statistically similar to observed timeseries considering various temporal scales and climate factors. This dataset consisting of CLIGEN inputs may be used to generate timeseries at any point in a 0.25 arc degree resolution grid covering South American and African continents.

      Long Term Ecological Research (LTER), Jornada Basin Data Catalog

        This dataset links to the Jornada data homepage, which links to 153 individual datasets. Those datasets can then be searched based on Title, Keyword, or Investigator. The Jornada Basin Long Term Ecological Research Program (JRN LTER) has been investigating desertification processes since 1982.

        PhenoCam images from JERNORT site, Jornada Experimental Range, New Mexico, USA since 2014

          This data set consists of repeat digital imagery from the phenocams at the Jornada Experimental Range. JER is a member of the PhenoCam network, which has as its mission to serve as a long-term, continental-scale, phenological observatory. Imagery is uploaded to the PhenoCam server every 30 minutes. The archived images provide a permanent record that can be visually inspected to determine the phenological state of the vegetation at any point in time. Quantitative data on the colour of vegetation—a proxy for its phenological state—can also be extracted from the images using simple image processing methods.

          PhenoCam images from JERSAND site, Jornada Experimental Range, New Mexico, USA since 2014

            This data set consists of repeat digital imagery from the phenocams at the Jornada Experimental Range. JER is a member of the PhenoCam network, which has as its mission to serve as a long-term, continental-scale, phenological observatory. Imagery is uploaded to the PhenoCam server every 30 minutes. The archived images provide a permanent record that can be visually inspected to determine the phenological state of the vegetation at any point in time. Quantitative data on the colour of vegetation—a proxy for its phenological state—can also be extracted from the images using simple image processing methods.

            PhenoCam images from JERBAJADA site, Jornada Experimental Range, New Mexico, USA since 2014

              This data set consists of repeat digital imagery from the phenocams at the Jornada Experimental Range. JER is a member of the PhenoCam network, which has as its mission to serve as a long-term, continental-scale, phenological observatory. Imagery is uploaded to the PhenoCam server every 30 minutes. The archived images provide a permanent record that can be visually inspected to determine the phenological state of the vegetation at any point in time. Quantitative data on the colour of vegetation—a proxy for its phenological state—can also be extracted from the images using simple image processing methods.