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Long Term Agroecosystem Research Overview

In pursuit of sustainable U.S. agriculture, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) launched the Long-Term Agroecosystem (LTAR) network. The LTAR network is composed of 18 locations distributed across the contiguous United States working together to address national and local agricultural priorities and advance the sustainable intensification of U.S. agriculture.

The LTAR network represents a range of major U.S. agroecosystems, including annual row cropping systems, grazinglands, and integrated systems representative of roughly 49 percent of cereal production, 30 percent of forage production, and 32 percent of livestock production in the United States. Furthermore, the LTAR sites span geographic and climatic gradients representing a variety of challenges and opportunities to U.S. agriculture.

The LTAR network uses experimentation and coordinated observations to develop a national roadmap for the sustainable intensification of agricultural production. While the LTAR network is a new network, experimentation and measurements began at some LTAR sites more than 100 years ago, while other locations started their research as recently as 19 years ago.

A primary goal of LTAR is to develop and to share science-based findings with producers and stakeholders. Tools, technologies, and management practices resulting from LTAR network science will be applied to the sustainable intensification of U.S. agriculture. Technical innovations, including new production techniques, genetics, and sensor infrastructure applied at the farm/ranch level can increase the capacity for adaptive management, reduce time and operational costs, and increase profits and the quality of life for producers.

For full list of LTAR sites, view the sites matrix at https://ltar.ars.usda.gov/sites/.

For more information about the LTAR network visit: https://ltar.ars.usda.gov

Datasets

4 datasets

ARS Water Database

    The ARS Water Data Base is a collection of precipitation and streamflow data from small agricultural watersheds in the United States. This national archive of variable time-series readings for precipitation and runoff contains sufficient detail to reconstruct storm hydrographs and hyetographs. There are currently about 14,000 station years of data stored in the data base. Watersheds used as study areas range from 0.2 hectare (0.5 acres) to 12,400 square kilometers (4,786 square miles). Raingage networks range from one station per watershed to over 200 stations. The period of record for individual watersheds vary from 1 to 50 years. Some watersheds have been in continuous operation since the mid 1930's.

    Data from: Threshold Behavior of Catchments with Duplex Hillslope Soils Feeding Soil Pipe Networks

      This dataset corresponds with two published studies conducted on loess covered catchments in northern Mississippi, USA within the Goodwin Creek Experimental Watershed that contain extensive networks of soil pipes and corresponding collapse features. These loess soils contain fragipan layers that were found to perch water, thereby initiating the piping processes. The dataset contains data from two papers, specifically these include: (i) the spatial distribution of soil pipe collapses and their size measurements from the Wilson et al. (2015) paper, and (ii) hydrologic measurements of perched water tables on hillslopes, water levels of selected soil pipe locations, and precipitation from the Wilson et al. (2017) paper.

      Agricultural Collaborative Research Outcomes System (AgCROS)

        The Agricultural Collaborative Research Outcomes System (AgCROS) is a growing “network of networks” that presently consists of multiple agricultural data networks: Nutrient Uptake and Outcome Network (NUOnet), the Greenhouse gas Reduction through Agricultural Carbon Enhancement Network (GRACEnet), Resilient Economic Agricultural Practices (REAP), Dairy Agriculture for People and the Planet (DAPP; Dairy Grand Challenge), Soil Health Assessment Network (SHAnet), Agricultural Antibiotic Resistance (AgAR), and the Long-Term Agroecosystem Research (LTAR) Network. By integrating these diverse database networks, AgCROS facilitates the flow of information and increases the cooperation among researchers participating in these networks.