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Long Term Agroecosystem Research Overview

In pursuit of sustainable U.S. agriculture, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) launched the Long-Term Agroecosystem (LTAR) network. The LTAR network is composed of 18 locations distributed across the contiguous United States working together to address national and local agricultural priorities and advance the sustainable intensification of U.S. agriculture.

The LTAR network represents a range of major U.S. agroecosystems, including annual row cropping systems, grazinglands, and integrated systems representative of roughly 49 percent of cereal production, 30 percent of forage production, and 32 percent of livestock production in the United States. Furthermore, the LTAR sites span geographic and climatic gradients representing a variety of challenges and opportunities to U.S. agriculture.

The LTAR network uses experimentation and coordinated observations to develop a national roadmap for the sustainable intensification of agricultural production. While the LTAR network is a new network, experimentation and measurements began at some LTAR sites more than 100 years ago, while other locations started their research as recently as 19 years ago.

A primary goal of LTAR is to develop and to share science-based findings with producers and stakeholders. Tools, technologies, and management practices resulting from LTAR network science will be applied to the sustainable intensification of U.S. agriculture. Technical innovations, including new production techniques, genetics, and sensor infrastructure applied at the farm/ranch level can increase the capacity for adaptive management, reduce time and operational costs, and increase profits and the quality of life for producers.

For full list of LTAR sites, view the sites matrix at https://ltar.ars.usda.gov/sites/.

For more information about the LTAR network visit: https://ltar.ars.usda.gov

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Datasets

610 datasets

Data from: Plant Tissue Characteristics of Miscanthus x giganteus v2

    As part of a study identifying relationships between environmental variables and insect distributions within a bioenergy crop, giant miscanthus (Miscanthus x giganteus) samples were collected in October 2016 at 33 locations within a field in southeast Georgia, USA. This dataset describes the chemical composition of giant miscanthus leaves and stems including the total carbon (TC) and nitrogen (TN) content, total macro- and micronutrients.

    Agricultural Collaborative Research Outcomes System (AgCROS)

      The Agricultural Collaborative Research Outcomes System (AgCROS) is a growing “network of networks” that presently consists of multiple agricultural data networks: Nutrient Uptake and Outcome Network (NUOnet), the Greenhouse gas Reduction through Agricultural Carbon Enhancement Network (GRACEnet), Resilient Economic Agricultural Practices (REAP), Dairy Agriculture for People and the Planet (DAPP; Dairy Grand Challenge), Soil Health Assessment Network (SHAnet), Agricultural Antibiotic Resistance (AgAR), and the Long-Term Agroecosystem Research (LTAR) Network. By integrating these diverse database networks, AgCROS facilitates the flow of information and increases the cooperation among researchers participating in these networks.

      Agricultural Collaborative Research Outcomes System (AgCROS)

        The Agricultural Collaborative Research Outcomes System (AgCROS) is a growing “network of networks” that presently consists of multiple agricultural data networks: Nutrient Uptake and Outcome Network (NUOnet), the Greenhouse gas Reduction through Agricultural Carbon Enhancement Network (GRACEnet), Resilient Economic Agricultural Practices (REAP), Dairy Agriculture for People and the Planet (DAPP; Dairy Grand Challenge), Soil Health Assessment Network (SHAnet), Agricultural Antibiotic Resistance (AgAR), and the Long-Term Agroecosystem Research (LTAR) Network. By integrating these diverse database networks, AgCROS facilitates the flow of information and increases the cooperation among researchers participating in these networks.

        SGP97 Surface: NOAA/ATDD Little Washita, Oklahoma Long Term Flux Site

        NAL Geospatial Catalog
          The temporal coverage for this dataset is as follows: Begin datetime: 1997-05-31 00:00:00, End datetime: 1997-08-09 23:59:59. NOAA/ATDD (Tilden Meyers) started operation of a long term flux monitoring site near the Little Washita watershed in Oklahoma in 1996. Half-hourly observations of wind speed and direction, air temperature, relative humidity, pressure, incoming global radiation, incoming and outgoing visible radiation, net radiation, ground heat flux, precipitation, wetness, skin temperature, soil temperature (at 2, 4, 8, 16, 32 and 64 cm), average wind vector speed, kinematic shear stress, streamwise velocity variance, crosswind velocity variance, vertical velocity variance, sensible heat flux, latent energy flux, CO2 flux and soil moisture at 20 cm (started 5 June 1997).

          Data from: Plant Tissue Characteristics of Miscanthus x giganteus

            As part of a study identifying relationships between environmental variables and insect distributions within a bioenergy crop, giant miscanthus (Miscanthus x giganteus) samples were collected in October 2016 at 33 locations within a field in southeast Georgia, USA. This dataset describes the chemical composition of giant miscanthus leaves and stems including the total carbon (TC) and nitrogen (TN) content, total macro- and micronutrients.