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27 years of livestock production data under different stocking rate levels at the Central Grasslands Research Extension Center near Streeter, North Dakota

    The effects of stocking rate on livestock performance and profitability were monitored on 12 pastures at the Central Grasslands Research Extension Center (CGREC) near Streeter, ND from 1989 through 2015. These data were produced from an investigation of how the impacts of grazing intensity on native range, in addition an economic component, was included to determine grazing intensity effect on animal production.

    Data from: Genomic divergence of zebu and taurine cattle identified through high-density SNP genotyping

      The following is taken directly from the introduction of the paper. In this study, we used a pure drift FST model [11] which assumes all animals originated from the same ancestral population. This model was applied to taurine and zebu animals to identify loci under selection. These two groups correspond to the main (and most ancestral) separation of domestic cattle, which in most but not all cases corresponds to animals adapted to tropical and temperate environments. The identification of such loci can aid in the identification of genes and genomic variants that are related to environmental adaptation and/or selection derived from human agro-pastoral activities.

      Data from: Environmental footprints of beef cattle production in the United States

        To quantify important environmental impacts of beef cattle production in the United States, surveys and visits of farms, ranches and feedlots were conducted throughout seven regions (Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, Northern Plains, Southern Plains, Northwest and Southwest). Life cycle environmental impacts of U.S. beef cattle production were determined. Annual carbon emission was 243 ± 26 Tg CO2e (21.3 ± 2.3 kg CO2e/kg carcass weight). Annual fossil energy use was 569 ± 53 PJ (50.0 ± 4.7 MJ/kg carcass weight). Blue water consumption was 23.2 ± 3.5 TL (2034 ± 309 L/kg carcass weight). Reactive nitrogen loss was 1760 ± 136 Gg N (155 ± 12 g N/kg carcass weight).