Low-Disturbance Manure Incorporation

The LDMI experiment (Low-Disturbance Manure Incorporation) was designed to evaluate nutrient losses with conventional and improved liquid dairy manure management practices in a corn silage (Zea mays) / rye cover-crop (Secale cereale) system. The improved manure management treatments were designed to incorporate manure while maintaining crop residue for erosion control. Field observations included greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes from soil, soil nutrient concentrations, crop growth and harvest biomass and nutrient content, as well as monitoring of soil physical and chemical properties. Observations from LDMI have been used for parameterization and validation of computer simulation models of GHG emissions from dairy farms (Gaillard et al., submitted). The LDMI experiment was performed as part of the Dairy CAP.

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Manure application methods for alfalfa-grass

The MAMA experiment (Manure Application Methods for Alfalfa-Grass), from the USDA-ARS research station in Marshfield, WI was designed to evaluate nutrient and pathogen losses with conventional and improved liquid dairy manure management practices for alfalfa-grass production. Observations from MAMA have also been used for parameterization and validation of computer simulation models of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from dairy farms.

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Effects of tannin in dairy cow diets and land application of manure on soil gas fluxes and nitrogen dynamics

This experiment was designed to determine if tannin concentration and nitrogen (N) content of field-applied dairy cow manure influences greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from soil, soil N mineralization, and plant productivity. The data presented include experimental design, soil physical characteristics, gas fluxes, soil nitrogen at 0-10 cm depth, soil nitrogen at 10-20 cm depth, chemical characteristics of dairy manure, and crop yield and biomass characteristics.

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