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Data from: Ploidy determination of buffel grass accessions in the USDA National Plant Germplasm System collection by flow cytometry

    The DNA content of 568 accessions of buffel grass in the USDA National Plant Germplasm System was determined through flow cytometry to predict their ploidy levels. Based on DNA content, 308 accessions were determined as tetraploids with 36 chromosomes, 139 as pentaploids with 45 chromosomes, 20 as hexaploids with 54 chromosomes, two as septaploids with 63 chromosomes, and 99 as aneuploids. Chromosome counts of selected plants confirmed ploidy levels from DNA findings. Chromosome number of euploid plants could be predicted from the DNA data.

    The Triticeae Toolbox

      [The Triticeae Toolbox](https://triticeaetoolbox.org/) (T3) webportal hosts data generated by the Triticeae Coordinated Agricultural Project (CAP), funded by the National Institute for Food and Agriculture (NIFA) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). T3 contains SNP, phenotypic, and pedigree data from wheat and barley germplasm in the Triticeae CAP integrating rapidly expanding DNA marker and sequence data with traditional phenotypic data.

      Data from: Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of the USDA Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) Germplasm Collections Using GBSpoly

        Population structure and genetic diversity of 417 USDA sweetpotato (*Ipomoea batatas*) accessions originating from 8 broad geographical regions (Africa, Australia, Caribbean, Central America, Far East, North America, Pacific Islands, and South America) were determined using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified with a genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) protocol, GBSpoly, optimized for highly heterozygous and polyploid species.

        Data from: Identification of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphic Loci Associated with Biomass Yield under Water Deficit in Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Using Genome-Wide Sequencing and Association Mapping

          Alfalfa is a worldwide grown forage crop and is important due to its high biomass production and nutritional value. However, the production of alfalfa is challenged by adverse environmental factors such as drought and other stresses. Developing drought resistance alfalfa is an important breeding target for enhancing alfalfa productivity in arid and semi-arid regions. In the present study, we used genotyping-by-sequencing and genome-wide association to identify marker loci associated with biomass yield under drought in the field in a panel of diverse germplasm of alfalfa.

          Data from: Genetic Architecture of Resistance to Stripe Rust in a Global Winter Wheat Germplasm Collection

            Virulence shifts in populations of *Puccinia striiformis* f. sp. *tritici* (*Pst*), the causal pathogen of wheat stripe rust, are a major challenge to resistance breeding. The majority of known resistance genes are already ineffective against current races of *Pst*, necessitating the identification and introgression of new sources of resistance. Germplasm core collections that reflect the range of genetic and phenotypic diversity of crop species are ideal platforms for examining the genetic architecture of complex traits such as resistance to stripe rust. We report the results of genetic characterization and genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) for resistance to stripe rust in a core subset of 1175 accessions in the National Small Grains Collection (NSGC) winter wheat germplasm collection, based on genotyping with the wheat 9K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) iSelect assay and phenotyping of seedling and adult plants under natural disease epidemics in four environments.

            The GRIN-Global Project

              GRIN-Global (GG) is a database application that enables genebanks to store and manage information associated with plant genetic resources (germplasm) and deliver that information globally. The GRIN-Global project's mission is to provide a scalable version of the Germplasm Resource Information Network (GRIN) suitable for use by any interested genebank in the world.

              National Microbial Germplasm Program

                The goal of the National Microbial Germplasm Program is to ensure that the genetic diversity of agriculturally important microorganisms is maintained to enhance and increase agricultural efficiency and profitability. The program collects, authenticates, and characterizes potentially useful microbial germplasm; preserves microbial genetic diversity; and facilitates distribution and utilization of microbial germplasm for research and industry.