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FACETS enterprise crop budgets for NE Florida and SW Georgia

    Enterprise budgets contained in this database were developed as part of the Floridian Aquifer Collaborative Engagement for Sustainability (FACETS), a large-scale, multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary project funded by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA). The goal of this project is to promote the economic sustainability of agriculture and silviculture in North Florida and South Georgia while protecting water quantity, quality, and habitat in the Upper Floridan Aquifer and the springs and rivers it feeds. This dataset includes budgets developed for pine plantations, corn and peanut crops in the Lower Suwannee River Basin, Florida.

    Data from: Chapter 5: Energy Use in Agriculture. U.S. Agriculture and Forestry Greenhouse Gas Inventory: 1990-2018

      The report 'U.S. Agriculture and Forestry Greenhouse Gas Inventory: 1990-2018' serves to estimate U.S. GHG emissions for the agricultural sector, to quantify uncertainty in emission estimates, and to estimate the potential of agriculture to mitigate U.S. GHG emissions. This dataset contains tabulated data from the figures and tables presented in Chapter 5, Energy Use in Agriculture, of the report. Data are presented for carbon dioxide emissions from on-farm energy use. Please refer to the report for full descriptions of and notes on the data.

      Farming Systems Study for Greenhouse gas Reduction through Agricultural Carbon Enhancement network in Morris, Minnesota

        Tillage is decreasing globally due to recognized benefits of fuel savings and improved soil health in the absence of disturbance. However, a perceived inability to control weeds effectively and economically hinders no-till adoption in organic production systems in the Upper Midwest, USA. A strip-tillage (ST) strategy was explored as an intermediate approach to reducing fuel use and soil disturbance, and still controlling weeds. An 8-year comparison was made between two tillage approaches, one primarily using ST the other using a combination of conventional plow, disk and chisel tillage [conventional tillage (CT)].

        On-Farm Residue Removal Study for Resilient Economic Agricultural Practices in Morris, Minnesota

          Interest in harvesting crop residues for energy has waxed and waned since the oil embargo of 1973. Since the at least the late 1990’s interest has been renewed due to concern of peak oil, highly volatile natural gas prices, replacing fossil fuel with renewable sources and a push for energy independence. The studies conducted on harvesting crop residues during the 1970’s and1980’s focused primarily on erosion risk and nutrient removal as a result early estimates of residue availability focused on erosion control.

          Transforming Drainage Research Data (USDA-NIFA Award No. 2015-68007-23193)

            This dataset contains research data compiled by the “Managing Water for Increased Resiliency of Drained Agricultural Landscapes” project a.k.a. Transforming Drainage (https://transformingdrainage.org). These data began in 1996 and include plot- and field-level measurements for 39 experiments across the Midwest and North Carolina. Practices studied include controlled drainage, drainage water recycling, and saturated buffers. In total, 219 variables are reported and span 207 site-years for tile drainage, 154 for nitrate-N load, 181 for water quality, 92 for water table, and 201 for crop yield.

            Data from: All-hazards dataset mined from the US National Incident Management System 1999–2014

              ICS-209-PLUS is a new dataset mined from the public archive (1999–2014) of the U.S. National Incident Management System/Incident Command System Incident Status Summary Form (a total of 124,411 reports for 25,083 incidents, including 24,608 wildfires). This system captures detailed information on incident management costs, personnel, hazard characteristics, values at risk, fatalities, and structural damage.