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IPM Images: The Source for Agriculture and Pest Management Pictures

    A joint project of The University of Georgia - Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources and College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, The Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health, USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Southern Integrated Pest Management Center, Southern Plant Diagnostic Network, and USDA/APHIS Identification Technology Program, [IPM Images](https://www.ipmimages.org/) image categories include: Commodity Groups; Taxonomy; Biological Controls; Damage Types; and Diseases.

    Data from: Defensive aphid symbiont Hamiltonella defensa effects on Aphelinus glycinis and Aphelinus atriplicis

      *Aphelinus glycinis* was collected in the Peoples Republic of China under a Memorandum of Understanding between their Ministry of Agriculture and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). *Aphelinus atriplicis* was collected by employees of the USDA, Agricultural Research Service (ARS), in the Republic of Georgia with the permission of that government. The parasitoids were imported into the USDA, ARS, Beneficial Insect Introductions Research Unit containment facility in Newark, Delaware, under permits from the USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (Permit Numbers P526P-08-02142 and P526P-09-01929). No specific permissions were required to collect *Aphis craccivora* or *Acyrthosiphon pisum* because these are cosmopolitan aphids that occur in the field throughout North America. None of the species collected or studied are endangered or protected.

      Data from: Host specificity of Aphelinus species considered for introduction to control Diuraphis noxia

        These data are results of laboratory experiments on host specificity of ten populations of seven species from two species complexes in the genus Aphelinus. Host specificity was not related to host plant species or the phylogenetic relatedness of the aphids or the parasitoids. From these results, we conclude that A. hordei is an excellent candidate for introduction into the USA to control D. noxia.

        Data from: Population dynamics of an invasive forest insect and associated natural enemies in the aftermath of invasion

          Datasets archived here consist of all data analyzed in Duan et al. 2015 from Journal of Applied Ecology. Specifically, these data were collected from annual sampling of emerald ash borer (*Agrilus planipennis*) immature stages and associated parasitoids on infested ash trees (*Fraxinus*) in Southern Michigan, where three introduced biological control agents had been released between 2007 - 2010.