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APEX – Agricultural Policy/Environmental eXtender Model

    Agricultural Policy/Environmental eXtender (APEX) has components for routing water, sediment, nutrients, and pesticides across complex landscapes and channel systems to the watershed outlet as well as groundwater and reservoir components. A watershed can be subdivided as much as necessary to assure that each subarea is relatively homogeneous in terms of soil, land use, management, and weather. APEX was constructed to evaluate various land management strategies considering sustainability, erosion (wind, sheet, and channel), economics, water supply and quality, soil quality, plant competition, weather, and pests. The routing of water, sediment, nutrient, and pesticide capabilities are some of the most comprehensive available in current landscape-scale models and can be simulated between subareas and channel systems within the model. APEX can perform long-term continuous simulations for modeling the impacts of different nutrient management practices, tillage operations, conservation practices, alternative cropping systems, and other management practices on surface runoff and losses of sediment, nutrients, and other pollutant indicators.

    iSnobal

      iSnobal is a physically-based distributed snowmelt model. A coupled energy and mass-balance model iSnobal is used to simulate the development and melting of the seasonal snowcover.

      NUOnet (Nutrient Use and Outcome Network) database

        The Nutrient Uptake and Outcomes (NUOnet) database will be able to help establish baselines on nutrient use efficiencies; processes contributing to nutrient losses; and processes contributing to optimal crop yield, nutritional and organoleptic quality. This national database could be used to calculate many different environmental indicators from a comprehensive understanding of nutrient stocks and flows.

        NAL Geodata

          The United States Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Library Geospatial Data catalog contains geographic location-based agricultural research data, imagery, research location context, and more. Users can search records representing a variety of datasets, maps and graphics, aerial and phenocam images, and other services.

          Data from: Gas emissions from dairy barnyards

            To assess the magnitude of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes, nutrient runoff and leaching from dairy barnyards and to characterize factors controlling these fluxes, nine barnyards were built at the U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center Farm in Prairie du Sac, WI (latitude 43.33N, longitude 89.71W). The barnyards were designed to simulate outdoor cattle-holding areas on commercial dairy farms in Wisconsin. Each barnyard was approximately 7m x 7m; areas of barnyards 1-9 were 51.91, 47.29, 50.97, 46.32, 45.64, 46.30, 48.93, 48.78, 46.73 square meters, respectively. Factors investigated included three different surface materials (bark, sand, soil) and timing of cattle corralling. Each barnyard included a gravity drainage system that allowed leachate to be pumped out and analyzed. Each soil-covered barnyard also included a system to intercept runoff at the perimeter and drain to a pumping port, similar to the leachate systems.

            Measured Annual Nutrient loads from AGricultural Environments (MANAGE) database

              The MANAGE (Measured Annual Nutrient loads from AGricultural Environments) database was developed to be a readily-accessible, easily-queried database of site characteristic and field-scale nutrient export data. Initial funding for MANAGE was provided by USDA-ARS to support the USDA Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) and the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board as part of their mission to understand and mitigate agricultural impacts on water quality. MANAGE contains data from a vast majority of published peer-reviewed N and P export studies on homogeneous cultivated, pasture/range, and forested land uses in the US under natural rainfall-runoff conditions, as well as artificially drained agricultural land. Thus MANAGE facilitates expanded spatial analyses and improved understanding of regional differences, management practice effectiveness, and impacts of land use conversions and management techniques, and it provides valuable data for modeling and decision-making related to agricultural runoff.

              Agricultural Conservation Planning Framework (ACPF) Toolbox

                The Agricultural Conservation Planning Framework (ACPF) Toolbox software includes tools to process the LiDAR-based digital elevation models for hydrologic analysis, which then allows a series of prioritization, riparian classification, and conservation-practice placement tools to be used. These toolsets identify agricultural fields most prone to deliver runoff directly to streams, map and classify riparian zones to inform whole-watershed riparian corridor management, and estimate the extent of tile drainage in the watershed. The software maps out suites of locations appropriate to install each of several types of conservation practices. These practice-placement opportunities are mapped for practices including controlled drainage, grassed waterways, water and sediment control basins, and nutrient removal wetlands. Rather than making any recommendations, ACPF provides an inventory of watershed assessment data and conservation placement opportunities across a watershed, in order to inform local watershed planning.